Vegetarian Food at the Folklife Festival 2013


Since 2006, it’s been my summer tradition to attend the Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall, watch performances, take photos, and buy whichever concessions my meat-free diet allows me to eat. In the past, I’ve indulged in varieties of fried potatoes, salads, corn on the cob, noodle dishes, and mango and sticky rice.

This year, it seemed there were several more vegetarian options than usual, and though I’ve gone to the Folklife Festival five times in the last week and a half (it’s break week between semesters!), I still have containers of food that I’ve brought home and not yet tried. Here’s everything I ordered:

Vegetable Combo (One World, Many Voices)

Vegetable Combo (One World, Many Voices; Ahaar – A Taste of India)

Banana Pudding and Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale (The Will to Adorn)

Banana Pudding and Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale (The Will to Adorn; Chicken and Waffles)

Vegetarian Indian Taco and Tamarind Agua Fresca

Vegetarian Indian Taco and Tamarind Agua Fresca (One World, Many Voices; A Taste of the Americas)

Mango Lassi and Jhal Muri

Mango Lassi and Jhal Muri (One World, Many Voices; Ahaar – A Taste of India)

Shopska Salad (Hungarian Heritage; Budapest Bistro)

Shopska Salad (Hungarian Heritage; Budapest Bistro)

Papri Chaat and Nimbu Paani (Lemonade) (One World, Many Voices; Ahaar - A Taste of India)

Papri Chaat and Nimbu Paani (Lemonade) (One World, Many Voices; Ahaar – A Taste of India)

Quinoa Summer Salad (One World, Many Voices; Sabor Latino)

Quinoa Summer Salad (One World, Many Voices; Sabor Latino)

Wild Rice & Watercress Salad (One World, Many Voices; A Taste of the Americas)

Wild Rice & Watercress Salad (One World, Many Voices; A Taste of the Americas)

Advertisements

About Laura

Paralegal with Master of Arts in Teaching in Museum Education, frequent museum visitor, based in Washington, DC. I care about what museums can do, both in terms of public offerings and internal practices, to make the world a better place. I blog about museum education ("informed"), the social work of museums ("humane"), and visitor experience ("citizenry").
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s